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Articles & Announcements

In Honour of the Tamarack

Green needles in spring / Softly adorn my branches / Blazing gold in fall / A last show before winter

I am Tamarack. The Algonquian people gave me this name which means "wood used for snowshoes". Others used the name hackmatack. Larch is another one of my names and you might know me as Eastern, Alaskan, American, Black or Red Larch.

Beluga Habitat Sustainability Plan

The Manitoba government has developed a Beluga Habitat Sustainability Plan for the Seal, Churchill and Nelson River estuaries. The plan outlines ways to support the Western Hudson Bay beluga population throughout its range. Belugas arrive in Manitoba's northern estuaries along the coast of Hudson Bay around mid-June and remain until mid-September. Activities in the estuaries revolve around calving, nurturing their young and moulting their skin.

Nature Manitoba's GIANT Garage Sale - Call for Volunteers

Nature Manitoba's GIANT Garage Sale will be held on Saturday, September 19th, at Holy Cross School, 300 Dubuc.
NM is looking for volunteers to help prepare the venue on the evening of September 18th (Friday), from approximately 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.  Volunteers with trucks are also needed to help transport donated items to the school for the set-up (evening of September 17th if you can store items in your vehicle until the 18th, or before 5:30 p.m. on September 18th).

11th Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference (Feb. 2016)

First Call for Posters & Presentations
11th Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference (February 16-18, 2016)

Saskatoon Inn, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Theme: “Prairie – It’s a Happening Place!”

The Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference (PCESC), February 16-18, 2016, in Saskatoon, is a forum to discuss the latest issues and trends in the conservation of prairie landscapes, species, and species at risk. The conference is held once every three years in a Canadian prairie city.  It is attended by approximately 350 participants from across Western Canada and the Northern Plains states.  It attracts a very diverse audience, including producers, policy makers and planners at all levels of government, conservation and other NGOs, researchers and graduate students from a wide array of disciplines.  For more information about the conference, go to www.pcesc.ca.

Great Bird Search & Robert Taylor Memorial Bird Blitz 2015

The Great Bird Search 2015

Join us on Saturday, May 30th, for The Great Bird Search. Participants will meet at 8:00 a.m. at the stable parking lot at Birds Hill Park. BBQ lunch will be provided but feel free to bring a small salad or a desert. Please remember your park pass! There is a $10.00 registration fee to participate. Register by calling Nature Manitoba at 204-943-9029 or emailing us at info@naturemanitoba.ca.

Job Posting: Coordinator for the Manitoba Important Bird Area Program

Nature Manitoba is seeking a part-time coordinator for the Manitoba Important Bird Area program. The position will initially be three days per week, commencing December 2014 (exact start date negotiable). It is envisioned that the successful candidate will work from Nature Manitoba's Winnipeg office; however, other locations may be acceptable to suit the successful candidate’s preference. Travel to various Manitoba locations will be involved.

Proposed Cemetery, just east past Faloma, Falcon Lake

A cemetery is now being proposed between the TransCanada Trail and the main Whiteshell Park service road. An enchanting Red Pine Forest had been planted there many years ago. A beautiful TransCanada Trail was built, from donations, through this forest. This area, being one of the most scenic parts of the Whiteshell Trail and on a lovely scenic drive for all park visitors, should not be developed.

After visiting the site, one realizes that the cutting down of many trees, making roads into the site, the use of much heavy machinery, the digging up of the fragile ecosystem, and the digging up of graves will destroy the scenic beauty of this spot. Future proposed expansion lies even closer to the trail and will entail more destruction. The small buffer of forest is not adequate between the trail and the cemetery. Many cars parked on the road or in a parking lot will further impact the area. The bedrock is not far from the surface and one wonders how the graves will be made deep enough. I’d like to see the forest and not a fenced cemetery when walking, hiking, skiing or biking along the trail.

There are more people benefiting from the Park’s natural beauty than would benefit from the cemetery. More development is not desirable to disturb the beauty of our Park.

Please, please, say NO to this project! The emails to write to are at the bottom of this post.

Marlene Pontifex
60 year resident of Falcon Lake & Nature Manitoba member

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