People passionate about nature

Past Discovery Evenings

Coexisting With Coyotes

Date: 

Monday, December 6, 2021

Presenter: 

Pauline Bloom, Lead Wildlife Biologist - Central Wildlife, Fisheries & Resource Enforcement Branch

Coyotes have an increasing presence in urban areas across North America, including here in Manitoba.  Coyotes have adapted to living amongst people and now people must learn how to coexist with coyotes.

Bird Stewardship in Manitoba

Date: 

Monday, November 15, 2021

Presenter: 

Amanda Shave, Manitoba Important Bird Areas Coordinator

The Manitoba Important Bird Areas program and Manitoba Chimney Swift Initiative have been busy despite the past couple of challenging seasons. Join us as we highlight the important work done by our volunteers across Manitoba's grassland, wetland, forest, lake and urban ecosystems.

Poweshiek Skipperling: Prairie Butterfly on the brink

Date: 

Monday, October 25, 2021

Presenter: 

Laura Burns, Reasearch Conservation Specialist, Assiniboine Park Zoo

Due to ongoing COVID-19 restrictions and concerns, Nature Manitoba will be implementing the following:

1. All attendees must show proof of double vaccination upon entry.

2. Masks must be worn at all times inside the Franco-Manitoban Cultural Centre.

3. Events will be held in a larger room (with triple our regular capacity) to accomodate social distancing.

Imagining Manitoba’s Future Climate

Date: 

Monday, February 3, 2020

Presenter: 

Danny Blair, Co-Director, Prairie Climate Centre; Professor of Geography, University of Winnipeg

Most Manitoban’s acknowledge that climate change is happening, and that we will have a different climate in the near future.  But many, and perhaps most, do not really have a clear picture of just how different it will be. The presentation will summarize what we know, and encourage all to imagine the consequences.

“The Flies that Bind” – the (little known) shared history of the Manitoba Museum and Nature Manitoba

Date: 

Monday, January 13, 2020

Presenter: 

Randy Mooi, Curator of Zoology, Manitoba Museum

One hundred years ago, with the formation of the Natural History Society of Manitoba (Nature Manitoba) in 1920, the Society became a key player in the creation of a permanent public museum. With incredible perseverance, by the likes of prominent Society members such a A.G. Lawrence, B.W. Cartwright and H.M.

The Backyard is My World and The World is My Backyard

Date: 

Monday, December 9, 2019

Presenter: 

Dennis Fast, past president of Manitoba Nature; birder and photographer

Birding, photography, and travel have been life-long passions for Dennis. On this evening's journey you will discover that “beauty is everywhere if you look, but it begins first of all in the heart.” From the world of backyard insects to polar bears and other wildlife you will hear stories of adventure and concern for the changing planet.

Orchids of Manitoba: 37 out of 26,567

Date: 

Monday, November 18, 2019

Presenter: 

Rose Kuzina, Nature Manitoba Trip Leader

Our province has a diversity of wild orchids. This presentation will introduce you to species you might not even recognize as orchids, show you where orchids grow, address the conservation status and current threats to Manitoba's orchids, as well as what we can do to help protect them. This presentation will be a visually entertaining look at the various habitats of Manitoba.

Polar Bears of the Western Hudson Bay

Date: 

Monday, October 7, 2019

Presenter: 

Daryll Hedman

Manitoba is home to the polar bears of the western Hudson Bay while on land during the Hudson Bay's ice-free period.  Come out and learn more about this Icon of the North.  This presentation will provide current information on denning activities, distribution, feeding habits and the effects of Climate Change.

Grasslands, Tundra and Apartments: Discoveries and Adventures from Nature Manitoba's Bird Stewardship Programs

Date: 

Monday, February 25, 2019

Presenter: 

Tim Poole, Coordinator, Manitoba Important Bird Areas and Manitoba Chimney Swift Initiative

Nature Manitoba hosts two bird stewardship programs: The Manitoba Important Bird Areas (IBA) Program and the Manitoba Chimney Swift Initiative (MCSI). In 2018, the IBA Program has been busy working across Manitoba, from the Nelson River and Churchill in the north, to the native grasslands in the southwest, and the Chimney Swifts have been keeping everyone busy to say the least.

The Crow Wing Trail and what it has to offer

Date: 

Monday, January 14, 2019

Presenter: 

Murielle Bugera, President of the Crow Wing Trail Association

Imagine being back in the mid-1800`s and what you would see as you are riding an ox cart. Tall grass prairie and pastures, crop lands and treed areas, wild flowers and rivers, and the rural communities grew from this land. Métis and First Nations people helped new immigrants learn to survive and thrive in this area of the province where Manitoba was born.

Caribou Calling

Date: 

Monday, December 3, 2018

Presenter: 

Vicki Trim, Northeast Region Wildlife Manager, Manitoba Sustainable Development

Come and hear about Manitoba's various caribou populations and how this species spends its life.  Information on the status and management of boreal woodland, eastern migratory woodland and barren-ground caribou populations will be presented.

The Caucasus: nature, scenery and culture

Date: 

Monday, November 12, 2018

Presenter: 

Rudolf Koes, Birder and Birding Tour Guide

This presentation will showcase the countries of Georgia and Armenia, with a special focus on the bird-life and flora. This region has seen an increase in tourism in general and eco-tourism in particular, due to relative political stability in recent years, but it is still unspoiled, without the hordes of tourists found elsewhere.

Land of the Saguaro

Date: 

Monday, October 22, 2018

Presenter: 

Marilyn Latta, Chair of the Habitat Conservation Committee and Weekend Botanist

The iconic Saguaro cactus is a keystone species of the Sonoran Desert, a unique area found primarily in Mexico but stretching north into southern Arizona. Marilyn Latta has spent part of the last five winters near Tucson exploring the area and learning about the relationships between the plants, birds and other wildlife that survive in this extreme desert environment.

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