People passionate about nature

Past Discovery Evenings

Manitoba’s Enchanted Isles – Exploring the Remote Islands of Lake Winnipeg’s North Basin

Date: 

Monday, January 21, 2013

Presenter: 

Randall Mooi, Curator of Zoology, The Manitoba Museum

The North Basin of Lake Winnipeg is dotted with several islands that have received only cursory attention from biologists. Dr. Randall Mooi has surveyed several of these islands for birds, amphibians and reptiles and has made some surprising discoveries: uniquely coloured snakes, unexpected toads, and rare birds, and even spiders that live in carnivorous plants. Join Dr.

North Pole Adventures

Date: 

Monday, December 10, 2012

Presenter: 

Darcy St. Laurent, Search and Rescue Technician

In the company of Eric Larsen and Antony Jinman, Darcy St. Laurent successfully completed a trek to the North Pole during the spring of 2010. The trio was flown in by ski plane to Cape Discovery on Ellesmere Island on March 3rd. Throughout the journey, the men experienced gruelling conditions that made progress difficult.

Hide and Seek with Amphibians and Reptiles in Southwestern Manitoba

Date: 

Monday, November 12, 2012

Presenter: 

Pamela Rutherford, Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Brandon University

Southwestern Manitoba is home to sixteen species of amphibians and reptiles, and several of these species have localized distributions. In addition, many of these same species are secretive and little is known about their natural history.

What are Forests Good For? The Many Values of Forests in Canada and Around the World

Date: 

Monday, October 29, 2012

Presenter: 

John Gray, Retired economist and forestry consultant

This evening John Gray will explore the diverse uses and values of forests, and some of the issues in managing forests, drawing on examples from Canada, Manitoba, and elsewhere in the World. John studied forestry at the University of British Columbia and worked in forestry in B.C. He has consulted on forestry issues for Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

Ecology of a Cultural Icon – The Lake Sturgeon

Date: 

Monday, October 15, 2012

Presenter: 

Dr. W. Gary Anderson, Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Manitoba

A life history strategy of slow growth and late sexual maturity have made Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) particularly vulnerable to over-fishing and habitat fragmentation. Over the last century, population declines have been sufficiently severe to lead to the potential listing of the species under the Species at Risk Act in Canada.

Shrinking Habitat, Dwindling Numbers: Manitoba’s Endangered Prairie Butterflies

Date: 

Monday, February 6, 2012

Presenter: 

Dr. Richard Westwood (Associate Professor, Environmental Studies Program, Department of Biology, University of Winnipeg)

The amount of undisturbed prairie habitat has diminished in Manitoba at an alarming rate over the past century. Dr. Westwood will explain the habitat requirements of several threatened and endangered butterfly species found only in Manitoba, and describe the history of the decline of these species.

The Polar Bears of Manitoba

Date: 

Monday, January 23, 2012

Presenter: 

Darryl Hedman (Northeast Regional Wildlife Manager, Manitoba Conservation)

Darryl Hedman’s presentation will focus on polar bear ecology as it relates to Churchill and Manitoba, the Polar Bear Alert program, and bear safety recommendations. Of the 19 sub-populations of polar bears, 13 of them are in Canada. Manitoba Conservation has surveyed polar bears in September since 1969. During the surveys, bear numbers are recorded as well as body condition and location.

Two National Parks, One Unique Perspective: Revelations of a Parks Canada Superintendent

Date: 

Monday, December 12, 2011

Presenter: 

Marilyn Peckett (Superintendent, Manitoba Field Unit, Parks Canada Agency)

Join Marilyn Peckett as she shares the charms and challenges of managing two different national parks. Separated by 90 years of history and two provinces apart, Elk Island and Wapusk provide valuable habitat for two of our country’s magnificent species at risk: the Wood Bison and Polar Bear.

Rediscovering Ernest Thompson Seton: A joint film presentation in cooperation with the Manitoba Historical Society

Date: 

Monday, November 14, 2011

Presenter: 

(This is a film viewing)

Ernest Thompson Seton (1860-1946) is described by the US National Park Service as “one of America’s greatest naturalists.” This artist, widely read author and scientist was instrumental in bringing the Boy Scout movement to the United States. Less well known are the years he spent in Manitoba documenting all its animal life including mammals, birds, fishes, snakes, etc.

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