People passionate about nature

Past Discovery Evenings

Ecology of a Cultural Icon – The Lake Sturgeon

Date: 

Monday, October 15, 2012

Presenter: 

Dr. W. Gary Anderson, Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Manitoba

A life history strategy of slow growth and late sexual maturity have made Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) particularly vulnerable to over-fishing and habitat fragmentation. Over the last century, population declines have been sufficiently severe to lead to the potential listing of the species under the Species at Risk Act in Canada.

Shrinking Habitat, Dwindling Numbers: Manitoba’s Endangered Prairie Butterflies

Date: 

Monday, February 6, 2012

Presenter: 

Dr. Richard Westwood (Associate Professor, Environmental Studies Program, Department of Biology, University of Winnipeg)

The amount of undisturbed prairie habitat has diminished in Manitoba at an alarming rate over the past century. Dr. Westwood will explain the habitat requirements of several threatened and endangered butterfly species found only in Manitoba, and describe the history of the decline of these species.

The Polar Bears of Manitoba

Date: 

Monday, January 23, 2012

Presenter: 

Darryl Hedman (Northeast Regional Wildlife Manager, Manitoba Conservation)

Darryl Hedman’s presentation will focus on polar bear ecology as it relates to Churchill and Manitoba, the Polar Bear Alert program, and bear safety recommendations. Of the 19 sub-populations of polar bears, 13 of them are in Canada. Manitoba Conservation has surveyed polar bears in September since 1969. During the surveys, bear numbers are recorded as well as body condition and location.

Two National Parks, One Unique Perspective: Revelations of a Parks Canada Superintendent

Date: 

Monday, December 12, 2011

Presenter: 

Marilyn Peckett (Superintendent, Manitoba Field Unit, Parks Canada Agency)

Join Marilyn Peckett as she shares the charms and challenges of managing two different national parks. Separated by 90 years of history and two provinces apart, Elk Island and Wapusk provide valuable habitat for two of our country’s magnificent species at risk: the Wood Bison and Polar Bear.

Rediscovering Ernest Thompson Seton: A joint film presentation in cooperation with the Manitoba Historical Society

Date: 

Monday, November 14, 2011

Presenter: 

(This is a film viewing)

Ernest Thompson Seton (1860-1946) is described by the US National Park Service as “one of America’s greatest naturalists.” This artist, widely read author and scientist was instrumental in bringing the Boy Scout movement to the United States. Less well known are the years he spent in Manitoba documenting all its animal life including mammals, birds, fishes, snakes, etc.

The Strange, Curious and Vanishing: Celebrating Manitoba’s Biological Diversity

Date: 

Monday, October 31, 2011

Presenter: 

James Duncan (Manager, Biodiversity, Habitat and Endangered Species Section, Wildlife and Ecosystem Protection Branch, Manitoba Conservation)

Manitoba is well known for its ‘cuddly’ polar bears, hypnotic Great Gray Owls and writhing masses of mating Garter Snakes. But it also home to dragon hunters, pseudo scorpions and other assorted creepy creatures. From three species of arrow worms to over 25,000 arthropods, Manitoba has it all.

On the Trail of Manitoba’s Big Cat – Separating Fact and Fiction

Date: 

Monday, October 17, 2011

Presenter: 

William Watkins (Biodiversity Conservation Zoologist, Wildlife and Ecosystem Protection Branch, Manitoba Conservation)

Have you ever wondered if there are cougars living in Manitoba? Recent reports of sightings and three dead animals turned into Manitoba Conservation in the last seven years have excited and sometimes alarmed the public.

Effects of Climate Change on Contaminants in Arctic Ecosystems

Date: 

Monday, January 24, 2011

Presenter: 

Dr. Gary Stern (DFO Research Chair, Centre for Earth Observation Science, University of Manitoba)

Dr. Stern is a senior research scientist with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (Freshwater Institute, Winnipeg) and a professor with the Centre for Earth Observation Science, Department of Geography, University of Manitoba.

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