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MNS Signs New Marsh Agreement

The Manitoba Naturalists Society signs an Agreement along with the Department of Natural Resources, Ducks Unlimited Canada and the Manitoba Wildlife Federation to establish a Heritage Marsh Program for Manitoba.

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Thursday, April 18, 1985

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From Nature Manitoba News, June, 1985

On April 18, 1985, the Manitoba Naturalists Society signed an Agreement along with the Department of Natural Resources, Ducks Unlimited Canada and the Manitoba Wildlife Federation to establish a Heritage Marsh Program for Manitoba. The program heralds a new beginning in marshland conservation by protecting key marshlands from detrimental land use activities. Under the ten year agreement, five well-known marshes already under intensive management automatically were declared Heritage Marshes and will be accorded specific long-time protection. These marshes are the Summerberry Marsh, Oak Hammock Marsh, Grant’s Lake, Proven Lake and Saskeram. Together these wetland areas emcompass 290,000 acres of prime marshland habitat. The Agreement also specifies ten candidate marshes which will be considered for Heritage Marsh Status once Crown land planning is finalized and consultation with rural municipalities and government departments is completed. The list of candidate marshes includes Delta Marsh, Netley-Libau Marshes, Whitewater Lake, Dennis Lake, Big Grass Marsh, Lindcluffe Marsh, Turtle Mountain Marsh, Oak-Plum Marshes, Marshy Point and Narcisse Wildlife Management Area.

Under the Agreement, the Manitoba Naturalists Society will provide technical advice on marshland management and wetland education projects. The Manitoba Government will dedicate Crown land adjacent to a marsh designated as a Heritage Marsh. Ducks Unlimited Canada will fund construction of capital works such as dikes, ditches, water control structures and nesting islands as jointly approved under the development plans. The Manitoba Wildlife Federation will assume responsibility for acquiring private lands adjacent to Heritage Marshes in cases where these lands are considered an integral part of the wetland management plan. Acquisition will be made through the Federation’s Habitat Trust Fund. In addition, Ducks Unlimited Canada has agreed to build bait stations where needed and to cooperate with the Manitoba Wildlife Federation in purchasing and leasing lure crop land adjacent to particular marshes.

The Society and all co-signatories to the Agreement will be members of a Heritage Marsh Advisory Committee to be chaired by the Director of Wildlife, Richard C. Goulden.

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